Crazy Quilt for Project Linus

Finished quilt

Finished quilt

Another quilt for Project Linus. The basic squares for this one was done in a crazy quilt template. The crazy patchwork is done on a foundation piece of lightweight cotton. The pattern is usually random. The center of each patchwork square is a pentagon. Other geomentric shapes (triangular) are used. I thought it would be a great idea to practice embellishment with Crazy Quilt stitches. I wasn’t brave enough to try beading, buttons, or lace. However, I did add appliques to each corner.

Crazy Quilt Square

Once the squares were completed, a layer of batting and a flannel backing were used. The corners were rounded and a bias binding was attached.

Crazy Quilt Corner 2

The following embroidery stitches were used: Fern leave stitch, french knots, and a running stitch.

Butterfly applique rests on floral spray.

Butterfly applique rests on floral spray.

Crazy Quilt Square 2

Spring Work Attire

My youngest daughter is a veternarian technician and works in St. Louis, Missouri. She asked me to make a scrub for her. Since purple is her favorite color, I thought I would whip one up for her using this fabric.

Paritially completed scrub.

Paritially completed scrub.


Here is what it looked like while it was under construction.

Closer look at the lime contrast bands.

Closer look at the lime contrast bands.

And yet, here, is another view.

Finished project.

Finished project.

Once completed, it looks like this. However, a close-up view is needed. See below.

Close Up of Scrub

This scrub was a quick to make project. I think the lime green contrasting bands add to its overall look. Don’t you?

Azulejo Tile Blanket

Portuguese Azulejo Tiles

Portuguese Azulejo Tiles

As I spent time organizing my yarn stash (remnants), I noticed that I had an assortment of blues. Inspired by the Portuguese Azulejo Tiles, my creativity juices started to flow. Above is the finished product.

003

Azulejo Tiling is a form of art that was introduced to Portugal through the Spanish Moors. This tiling craftsmanship can be traced back to the ancient Persians. The challenge lay in capturing this concept in crochet.

004

Azulejo Tiles are glazed in a single color and decorated in geometric patterns, usually blue ceramic tile. They are used to adorn many of the Portuguese homes. For my version, I used an off-white or cream color as the basic single color and various shades of blue for the geometric pattern.

005

What better way to capture this idea than with the granny square. Rows of granny squares using the blue color family and a basic cream (off white) background create a nice version of the tiling motif.

Close up

To think that this square and a picture of Portuguese blue tile (Azulejo) could end in a delightful blanket. The blanket consists of 35 granny square. Each granny square measures 5.5 inches. The squares were joined together using a Flat Braid Join. This was done in a blue. A final edging in cream (off white) using double crochet stitches completes this blanket.

Yarn Stash

As it is with anyone who loves to work with yarn, I had an abundance supply of singleton skeins and partial skeins that were left over from previous projects. Thanks to my girlfriend and fellow crafter, Elaine, I was inspired to organize the ever-growing mound of stashed yarns. So, I gathered them all up and placed them into two 10-gallon plastic bins. Slowly, I’ve started organizing them by color families and rolling them into smaller balls. Additionally, I’ve kept them in groupings by yarn weights. For example, all sports weight remnants and baby yarn were grouped together.

Overflowing Mound of Yarn

Overflowing Mound of Yarn

Color Families

Color Families

My goal is to go through the first bin and roll up any partial skeins and bag them according to color families. This will be an ongoing project as I can do this at night while watching television. My sweet hubby has been kind enough to help me roll the yarn into balls. This organizational project will make yarn easily and readily available for future projects. Gearing up for happy needlecrafting.